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RECENT ADDITIONS IN L'AN V (2024)

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[Updated: 4 March, 2024]

Some quick links to recent/ongoing projects:

ADDITIONS IN 2024 / L'AN V

February 2024

Blog posts:

  1. [to come]

Talks and Papers:

  • [to come]

Additions to the Library:

  • Jeremy Bentham, The Book of Fallacies (1824) in enhanced HTML and facs, PDF: eBook HTML, PDF, and ePub. The first edition was published in French and only later appeared in English. This book is not well known but it is an important demolition job on how politicians and bureaucrats deceive the people in order to stay in power, legitimize their rule, and protect their vested interests. He has a deep understanding of how politics works, with his discussions of the constant struggle between “The Ins” vs. “The Outs” to win political office, the “sinister interests” of the ruling elites and their allies, and how easily the public is fooled into accepting what is going on. Bastiat (and Molinari) quoted Bentham and probably knew this work as it was first published in French. Bastiat might have been inspired by it to write his magnificent series of “Sophismes” which are quite similar to Bentham’s Fallacies.
  • Volume 1 of The Clarke Papers. Selections from the Papers of William Clarke, Secretary to the Council of the Army, 1647-1649 (1891), which contains the minutes of the Putney Debates which were held between 28 October - 11 November 1647 in a church in Putney, London: enhanced HTML and facs. PDF.
  • Ludwig von Mises, Nationalökonomie: Theorie des Handlens und Wirtschaftens (1940). Before there was the theory of "human action" (1949) there was the theory of "Handlen und Wirtschaften" (trading and economizing) (1940). The Mises Institute is commemorating the 75th anniversary of the publication of the former with a "Human Action Conference" 16-18 May. I am doing my bit by publishing online the latter. Note that the Mises Institute also publishers the 1949 edition of HA in various formats. My edition of Nationalökonomie in enhanced HTML and facs. PDF; eBook HTML, PDF, and ePub.

Note on the Putney Debates

  • The "Putney Debates" (28 October - 11 November 1647) were held in a church in Putney, London which involved officers of the New Model Army, "agitators" (representatives of other army units), and some civilians to discuss
    • what demands the Army would make to Parliament regarding the payment of arrears of pay, indemnity for actions taken by individual soldiers during the war (such as taking horses from civilans (punishable by death in normal courts), and
    • changes in the form of government and electoral representation which they wanted to see enacted. The debate was heavily inlfluenced by Leveller ideas which were advocated by Edward Sexby, Colonel Rainborow, John Wildman, Col. Lilburne, and Coil. Overton.
  • The culmination of the events of 1647 were two important documents:
  • The radical Levellers John Wildman and John Lilburne believed they had been betrayed by Cromwell and other more conservative senior officiers whom they denounced as "serpents" and jugglers" in
  • The key events and documents of this momentous year are the following:
    • Feb. and March: Parliament decides to drastically cut the size of the Army in England and to send thousands to fight in Ireland
    • 15-16 May: Members of the Army meet in Saffron Waldon to discuss their grievances (minutes of meetings in the Clarke Papers)
    • 18 May: Parliament decides to immediately disband the New Model Army
    • 2 June: in response, the officer ("Cornet") George Joyce takes King Charles away from the custody of Parliament and takes him to Gen. Fairfax's HQ south of Cambridge, to use as a bargaining chip in negotiations
    • 4-5 June: the Army meets at Kentford Heath where the regiments agree to the petition "A Solemne Engagement of the Army " (5 June, 1647) which was followed soon afterwards by another petition to Parliament "A Declaration of the Army" (14 June 1647)
    • 16-17 July: the General Council of the Army meets at Reading to discuss a list of demands called "The Heads of the Proposals offered by the Army" which is published on 28 July
    • August: a mob attempts to take control of Parliament and the House of Lords on 26 July prompting the Army to occupy London (4-7 August); 24 Aug. the King is moved to Hampton Court; and the Army moves its HQ to Putney.
    • 9 Sept.: the first meeting of the General Council of the Army meets in Putney Church.
    • Oct.: the General Council discusses a document possibly written by John Wildman, "The Case of the Armie Truly stated" (15 October 1647); and then "The First Agreement of the People" (published 3 Nov. 1647) the full title of which was "An Agreement of the People for a firme and present Peace, upon grounds of common-right and freedome".
    • 28 Oct. - 11 Nov.: The Putney Debates take place (in the Clarke Papers)
    • 3 Nov.: "The First Agreement of the People" is published; the full title of which was "An Agreement of the People for a firme and present Peace, upon grounds of common-right and freedome"
    • 11 Nov.: the King escapes from Hampton Court
    • 17 Nov.: the Army leaves Putney
    • 23 Nov.: "The Petition of November" (23 Nov. 1647) is presented to the Parliament
    • 30 Dec.: John Wildman's (with William Walwyn) harsh criticism of the compromises many in the Army made (such as Cromwell and Ireton) following the Putney Debates in "Putney Projects. Or the Old Serpent in a new Forme" (30 December 1647). This disappointment for the radical Levellers had been foreseen by Lilburne in late September in The Juglers discovered.
  • see the full list of Leveller Tracts and Pamphlets - 144 are online

 

 

Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973)

Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832)

       

New this month to the eBook Collection on Liberty and Power - [ToC]

       

January 2024

Blog posts:

  1. [to come]

Talks and Papers:

  • [to come]

Additions to the Library:

   

James Harrington (1611–1677)

Benjamin Constant (1767-1830)

       

New this month to the eBook Collection on Liberty and Power - [ToC]